Restaurant Reality Check

by Dana S. Bader
Hits: 101

This weekend I went out to eat Indian food with my family. We had been craving butter chicken for a couple of weeks, and this Friday seemed like the perfect time to conquer that craving. When we arrived at the restaurant, it was busy as usual, but it was only a 35-minute wait for a table so we took our beeper and wandered around the nearby shops to busy ourselves with window shopping.  Once we were called and settled into our table, we began ordering in earnest so we could sit back and enjoy some light lunch conversation while we waited for the food to come.  So far so good, or so we thought.

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Taming Your Talking Toddler

by Dana S. Bader
Hits: 104

Parents spend an extraordinary amount of time and effort on trying to get their kids to start talking.  The first babbles and gurgles that come out of their mouths are so precious, and when they say their first, “mama,” we feel fulfilled to our very core.  After their first wonder words, the fun really begins.  Sometime after their second birthday, they transform into little parrots who mimic every word we say.  Even when they say their first defiant, “No!” we believe they are cute.  It is only later around the age of three or four when talking back takes a U-turn from adorable to abominable.

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Food Wars

by Dana S. Bader
Hits: 119

I kid you not.  For about two years of my eldest daughter’s life when she was two and three years old, she ate nothing but nuggets, small cocktail weenies, corn, plain rice, plain yogurt, parfait fruit yogurt without bits, and slices of plain white bread. Oh, and she could only eat one food at a time.  In fact, only one type of food could be served on her plate at a time because different foods could not touch.  For a while, she even wiped her fork with a napkin between bites to get the remains of the previous bite off the fork before she took the next bite.  She also drank only fruit cocktail juice out of a box with a straw.  Every meal was fraught with tension and involved begging (from me), tears or tantrums (from her), and several substitutions until she finally would take a bit of something, anything, just to ‘keep from starving.’

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