Make Math Matter

by Dana Smith Bader
Hits: 111

I was never really a math person.  Back when I was in school, especially in secondary school, children considered themselves math or language kids.  I was definitely a language kid.  I loved everything about English – I loved reading, writing, and speaking – and I even went on to study English and writing in university.

As a language kid, I was not encouraged to excel in math, or anything related to math.  I could do math, with a lot of effort and homework support from my father, an engineer, but I never liked math.  I thought math was boring.  As a result, I was never really interested in math.  I couldn’t figure out why it was important or even when I would need it in later life.

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Reading Rocks

by Dana Smith Bader
Hits: 74

I love everything about books. I love the feel of the pages, the way they smell, and the many faraway places a book takes me.  Perhaps I love them because my mother and father love books, and they read to me constantly when I was a small child.  As my children grew, I tried to pass my love for books and reading on to my children by reading to them, and I hope they will do the same for their children someday.

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Sensory Play Essentials

by Dana Smith Bader
Hits: 116

My youngest daughter used to put everything in her mouth.  That’s how she explored the world.  From toys to table edges, and Ritz crackers to remote controls, her need to explore the world with her mouth was never ending.  Even when she entered nursery and later when she moved on to KG1, she craved oral sensory satisfaction.  When she graduated from chewing on toys to gnawing on pencils, I became concerned.  First, she would chew off the eraser and then she would bite and gnaw the pencil until all of the wood was shredded into bits. If I let her, she could go through 3 or 4 pencils each week.  Luckily, she had a very experienced KG teacher who took the time to explain to me that my daughter was craving sensory experiences and that I needed to provide more sensory play so that she could satisfy her cravings and move beyond her fixation on oral stimuli.  She also promised to include more sensory play in her EYFS classroom for all of the children, explaining that sensory play was essential to all of the children’s growth and development.

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